Could Kansas and Embiid be in for a fierce night?

OSU Texas Tech Basketball.JPEG-0d909Tonight at the United Spirit Arena the Jayhawks come into town to face the scrappy Texas Tech Red Raiders that are coming off a grueling loss against Iowa State just three days ago. Kansas is expecting to have Joel Embiid back after he missed last Saturday’s matchup against TCU and KU fans can only hope that he returns to the fearful force he was earlier this season. In fact, the Jayhawks are on the high end right now with Embiid coming back, Andrew Wiggins playing great, on the run for a number one seed, and the madness not too far away. Any sane person would count out the Raiders with their mediocre 13-12 record and 5-7 conference record right? Wrong. The 8th ranked KU squad will face a team bent on turning the beloved Rock Chalk fan’s chance of gaining a number one seed for the 11th time out the door. Even with the recent loss, Tech has been on their mark over the past four games with wins coming against Oklahoma, TCU, and of course the Oklahoma State Cowboys. Jaye Crockett has been on a tear averaging 15.3 points, 8.7 rebounds, and 1.0 block over their past three game win streak. He is emerging as a matchup threat to the phenom Wiggins and the backcourt of the Raiders has much size over the Jayhawks. Naddir Thorpe is a floor leader that knows how to play team basketball, but his size might be an issue as he will likely be guarded by Junior Toddrick Gotcher who’s 6’4 200 pound frame will compare favorably against Thorpe’s 5’11 170 pound skeleton. Not only that, but there’s a good chance that Joel Embiid is still not 100% healthy right now. The Red Raiders could use the mighty Dejan Kravic’s 7′ Canadian muscle to draw Embiid into foul trouble. Without a viable center you can bet Texas Tech will be smelling blood because scoring in the paint has been their omen this season. With Tubby Smith leading his Raiders into battle I’m sure we’ll see a dog fight that’ll be attacked with ferocious intensity and clever strategy, after all they have had six out of 14 kids make the dean’s list so I’m sure they’ve been studying up on Kansas since they left Ames.

Romophobics

imageIt’s the ending of an unimaginable game in which the Dallas Cowboys have once again been overtaken in a uncontested matchup that was in their hands by halftime. December 15th of 2013 was a day that not only people in Texas, but football fans everywhere began starting to speculate who will go first: Tony Romo or head coach Jason Garrett. To give up a 23 point lead to an Aaron Rodger-less Packers team that had not amounted to anything the first half was put to life with, in my opinion, some of the worst situational coaching I’ve ever seen in sports. Not everyone sees it like that though. With losing comes common blame to the quarterback of course and to be honest Tony Romo already has a history of historical mishaps. So the question I’m here to answer is can we assume that it would be in the Dallas Cowboys’ best interest to discard Tony Romo? This esteemed writer says no. Lets examine Romo’s past.
Antonio Ramiro Romo was born in San Diego, California and grew up most of his life in the tundra of Burlington, Wisconsin. He was an overachieving athlete in several sports such as football, golf, basketball, and tennis for the Burlington Demons. He played his college ball at Eastern Illinois University and won the Walter Payton Award in 2002 (best player in D-II) and during the previous year led the Panthers to a conference title. Even though Romo went undrafted during the 2004 offseason, he still displayed amazing numbers in college while breaking several records and becoming the first player in EIU to have their number retired. Now I’m positive that most Dallas fans are not gonna argue with Romo’s statistical output as he has displayed All-Pro numbers. With three Pro-Bowls, Cowboy records for most games with 300 yards passing, passing touchdowns in a season (36), passing yards in a season (4,903), pass completions in a season (405), and in his first 100 career starts Tony Romo has thrown for 27,485 yards which is the most since 1960.
When Romo began his career with the Cowboys he quickly developed without having his first start till 2006 replacing Drew Bledsoe during a tough matchup against their NFC East rival New York Giants. Romo was indeed sought after as a player by several teams before Dallas locked him into his luxurious contract. Mike Shanahan of the Denver Broncos, at the time, was in pursuit of Romo when he completed his draft combine in 04′ and was also in the eye of former Cowboys offensive coordinator, now New Orleans Saints head coach, Sean Payton. Payton offered the Cowboys a 3rd round pick in early 2006, but Jerry Jones declined insinuating that he would need a 2nd round pick and nothing less of that. So we can easily see by this that Romo was a talented player with ideal intangibles for an NFL quarterback.
So lets hear it, Romo can’t play clutch football. When it comes to late game heroics he hasn’t always been what we can call reliable. So where do we start? Maybe with his first playoff start at Seattle where he mishandled the snap during what would of been a 19 yard field goal to give Dallas the lead with 1:19 left in the fourth. Perhaps it was the playoff game when in 2007, Romo ended the game by throwing an interception to R. W. McQuarters to give the New York Giants their first victory in the playoffs in what would be a season they’d never forget. Could it be the blowout lost to the Eagles the following year in which Romo was the cause of three costly turnovers? Or maybe it was their crushing lost to the Minnesota Vikings in 2009 when Romo was out-dueled by soon to be Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre? How about the recent loss in the 2012 season when Romo threw a pick to Redskins linebacker Rob Jackson to collectively end the Cowboys campaign that year. That list is pretty hefty with moments of utter disappointment in clutch times, but how could it be possible that perhaps Tony Romo is playing the role of scapegoat in a larger scheme of things.
One man has been largely responsible for cultivating the disappointing seasons in Dallas, Mr. Jerry Jones. As you may already know, Jerry Jones is only one of three NFL franchise owners that which the owner is also the general manager along with the Oakland Raider’s Al Davis and the Cincinnati Bengals Mike Brown. You may be asking yourself, “What does this have to do with Romo and the Cowboys losing important games late in the season? Dallas has gone through several head coaches, hundreds of assistants, but only one general manager during its Super Bowl drought. What seems to be the only consistent here? Oh right, Jerry Jones. His arrogance has clouded his judgement to pursue the Dallas Cowboys’ best interest to instead make sure he gets ideal credit for any success the team earns. The decision for owners to hold GM powers to themselves has proven to hold a great margin for failure as the Oakland Raiders haven’t visited the post season in 11 years and the Bengals haven’t won a playoff game in 22 years. When you combine this with weak personnel like puppet head coach Jason Garrett then you get a football team being controlled by one man. As much as we like to hold the quarterback accountable for all of the team’s success and failures, we need to open our eyes to the realization that Super Bowl caliber teams are built from much more. Jimmie Johnson had reign over his Cowboy teams of the 90’s era which enabled him to build a dynasty that formulated America’s team. With Johnson receiving heavy praise over his accomplishments it was surprising to see him quit following the 93′ Super Bowl season, but he saw it as a result of Jones taking over complete control over all team functions.
So we wonder how we will ever get back to the glory years of the 70’s and 90’s? For me the answer is pretty black and white. Cancel Jerry’s mass involvement within the team and hire yourself an experienced general manager and a damn good head coach. As long as these factors continue to not change, then you can pretty much kiss any post season success goodbye. Throw Brady in there, even Payton, and you can bet that you won’t see much of a difference. Folks, you need to hang on to Tony Romo. He could very well be the most talented quarterback in Cowboys history and possibly could have had a few rings by now if circumstances would have led him to another team. Love him or hate him, but you don’t know what you got till it’s gone.It’s the ending of an unimaginable game in which the Dallas Cowboys have once again been overtaken in a uncontested matchup that was in their hands by halftime. December 15th of 2013 was a day that not only people in Texas, but football fans everywhere began starting to speculate who will go first: Tony Romo or head coach Jason Garrett. To give up a 23 point lead to an Aaron Rodger-less Packers team that had not amounted to anything the first half was put to life with, in my opinion, some of the worst situational coaching I’ve ever seen in sports. Not everyone sees it like that though. With losing comes common blame to the quarterback of course and to be honest Tony Romo already has a history of historical mishaps. So the question I’m here to answer is can we assume that it would be in the Dallas Cowboys’ best interest to discard Tony Romo? This esteemed writer says no. Lets examine Romo’s past.
Antonio Ramiro Romo was born in San Diego, California and grew up most of his life in the tundra of Burlington, Wisconsin. He was an overachieving athlete in several sports such as football, golf, basketball, and tennis for the Burlington Demons. He played his college ball at Eastern Illinois University and won the Walter Payton Award in 2002 (best player in D-II) and during the previous year led the Panthers to a conference title. Even though Romo went undrafted during the 2004 offseason, he still displayed amazing numbers in college while breaking several records and becoming the first player in EIU to have their number retired. Now I’m positive that most Dallas fans are not gonna argue with Romo’s statistical output as he has displayed All-Pro numbers. With three Pro-Bowls, Cowboy records for most games with 300 yards passing, passing touchdowns in a season (36), passing yards in a season (4,903), pass completions in a season (405), and in his first 100 career starts Tony Romo has thrown for 27,485 yards which is the most since 1960.
When Romo began his career with the Cowboys he quickly developed without having his first start till 2006 replacing Drew Bledsoe during a tough matchup against their NFC East rival New York Giants. Romo was indeed sought after as a player by several teams before Dallas locked him into his luxurious contract. Mike Shanahan of the Denver Broncos, at the time, was in pursuit of Romo when he completed his draft combine in 04′ and was also in the eye of former Cowboys offensive coordinator, now New Orleans Saints head coach, Sean Payton. Payton offered the Cowboys a 3rd round pick in early 2006, but Jerry Jones declined insinuating that he would need a 2nd round pick and nothing less of that. So we can easily see by this that Romo was a talented player with ideal intangibles for an NFL quarterback.
So lets hear it, Romo can’t play clutch football. When it comes to late game heroics he hasn’t always been what we can call reliable. So where do we start? Maybe with his first playoff start at Seattle where he mishandled the snap during what would of been a 19 yard field goal to give Dallas the lead with 1:19 left in the fourth. Perhaps it was the playoff game when in 2007, Romo ended the game by throwing an interception to R. W. McQuarters to give the New York Giants their first victory in the playoffs in what would be a season they’d never forget. Could it be the blowout lost to the Eagles the following year in which Romo was the cause of three costly turnovers? Or maybe it was their crushing lost to the Minnesota Vikings in 2009 when Romo was out-dueled by soon to be Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre? How about the recent loss in the 2012 season when Romo threw a pick to Redskins linebacker Rob Jackson to collectively end the Cowboys campaign that year. That list is pretty hefty with moments of utter disappointment in clutch times, but how could it be possible that perhaps Tony Romo is playing the role of scapegoat in a larger scheme of things.
One man has been largely responsible for cultivating the disappointing seasons in Dallas, Mr. Jerry Jones. As you may already know, Jerry Jones is only one of three NFL franchise owners that which the owner is also the general manager along with the Oakland Raider’s Al Davis and the Cincinnati Bengals Mike Brown. You may be asking yourself, “What does this have to do with Romo and the Cowboys losing important games late in the season? Dallas has gone through several head coaches, hundreds of assistants, but only one general manager during its Super Bowl drought. What seems to be the only consistent here? Oh right, Jerry Jones. His arrogance has clouded his judgement to pursue the Dallas Cowboys’ best interest to instead make sure he gets ideal credit for any success the team earns. The decision for owners to hold GM powers to themselves has proven to hold a great margin for failure as the Oakland Raiders haven’t visited the post season in 11 years and the Bengals haven’t won a playoff game in 22 years. When you combine this with weak personnel like puppet head coach Jason Garrett then you get a football team being controlled by one man. As much as we like to hold the quarterback accountable for all of the team’s success and failures, we need to open our eyes to the realization that Super Bowl caliber teams are built from much more. Jimmie Johnson had reign over his Cowboy teams of the 90’s era which enabled him to build a dynasty that formulated America’s team. With Johnson receiving heavy praise over his accomplishments it was surprising to see him quit following the 93′ Super Bowl season, but he saw it as a result of Jones taking over complete control over all team functions.
So we wonder how we will ever get back to the glory years of the 70’s and 90’s? For me the answer is pretty black and white. Cancel Jerry’s mass involvement within the team and hire yourself an experienced general manager and a damn good head coach. As long as these factors continue to not change, then you can pretty much kiss any post season success goodbye. Throw Brady in there, even Payton, and you can bet that you won’t see much of a difference. Folks, you need to hang on to Tony Romo. He could very well be the most talented quarterback in Cowboys history and possibly could have had a few rings by now if circumstances would have led him to another team. Love him or hate him, but you don’t know what you got till it’s gone.It’s the ending of an unimaginable game in which the Dallas Cowboys have once again been overtaken in a uncontested matchup that was in their hands by halftime. December 15th of 2013 was a day that not only people in Texas, but football fans everywhere began starting to speculate who will go first: Tony Romo or head coach Jason Garrett. To give up a 23 point lead to an Aaron Rodger-less Packers team that had not amounted to anything the first half was put to life with, in my opinion, some of the worst situational coaching I’ve ever seen in sports. Not everyone sees it like that though. With losing comes common blame to the quarterback of course and to be honest Tony Romo already has a history of historical mishaps. So the question I’m here to answer is can we assume that it would be in the Dallas Cowboys’ best interest to discard Tony Romo? This esteemed writer says no. Lets examine Romo’s past.
Antonio Ramiro Romo was born in San Diego, California and grew up most of his life in the tundra of Burlington, Wisconsin. He was an overachieving athlete in several sports such as football, golf, basketball, and tennis for the Burlington Demons. He played his college ball at Eastern Illinois University and won the Walter Payton Award in 2002 (best player in D-II) and during the previous year led the Panthers to a conference title. Even though Romo went undrafted during the 2004 offseason, he still displayed amazing numbers in college while breaking several records and becoming the first player in EIU to have their number retired. Now I’m positive that most Dallas fans are not gonna argue with Romo’s statistical output as he has displayed All-Pro numbers. With three Pro-Bowls, Cowboy records for most games with 300 yards passing, passing touchdowns in a season (36), passing yards in a season (4,903), pass completions in a season (405), and in his first 100 career starts Tony Romo has thrown for 27,485 yards which is the most since 1960.
When Romo began his career with the Cowboys he quickly developed without having his first start till 2006 replacing Drew Bledsoe during a tough matchup against their NFC East rival New York Giants. Romo was indeed sought after as a player by several teams before Dallas locked him into his luxurious contract. Mike Shanahan of the Denver Broncos, at the time, was in pursuit of Romo when he completed his draft combine in 04′ and was also in the eye of former Cowboys offensive coordinator, now New Orleans Saints head coach, Sean Payton. Payton offered the Cowboys a 3rd round pick in early 2006, but Jerry Jones declined insinuating that he would need a 2nd round pick and nothing less of that. So we can easily see by this that Romo was a talented player with ideal intangibles for an NFL quarterback.
So lets hear it, Romo can’t play clutch football. When it comes to late game heroics he hasn’t always been what we can call reliable. So where do we start? Maybe with his first playoff start at Seattle where he mishandled the snap during what would of been a 19 yard field goal to give Dallas the lead with 1:19 left in the fourth. Perhaps it was the playoff game when in 2007, Romo ended the game by throwing an interception to R. W. McQuarters to give the New York Giants their first victory in the playoffs in what would be a season they’d never forget. Could it be the blowout lost to the Eagles the following year in which Romo was the cause of three costly turnovers? Or maybe it was their crushing lost to the Minnesota Vikings in 2009 when Romo was out-dueled by soon to be Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre? How about the recent loss in the 2012 season when Romo threw a pick to Redskins linebacker Rob Jackson to collectively end the Cowboys campaign that year. That list is pretty hefty with moments of utter disappointment in clutch times, but how could it be possible that perhaps Tony Romo is playing the role of scapegoat in a larger scheme of things.
One man has been largely responsible for cultivating the disappointing seasons in Dallas, Mr. Jerry Jones. As you may already know, Jerry Jones is only one of three NFL franchise owners that which the owner is also the general manager along with the Oakland Raider’s Al Davis and the Cincinnati Bengals Mike Brown. You may be asking yourself, “What does this have to do with Romo and the Cowboys losing important games late in the season? Dallas has gone through several head coaches, hundreds of assistants, but only one general manager during its Super Bowl drought. What seems to be the only consistent here? Oh right, Jerry Jones. His arrogance has clouded his judgement to pursue the Dallas Cowboys’ best interest to instead make sure he gets ideal credit for any success the team earns. The decision for owners to hold GM powers to themselves has proven to hold a great margin for failure as the Oakland Raiders haven’t visited the post season in 11 years and the Bengals haven’t won a playoff game in 22 years. When you combine this with weak personnel like puppet head coach Jason Garrett then you get a football team being controlled by one man. As much as we like to hold the quarterback accountable for all of the team’s success and failures, we need to open our eyes to the realization that Super Bowl caliber teams are built from much more. Jimmie Johnson had reign over his Cowboy teams of the 90’s era which enabled him to build a dynasty that formulated America’s team. With Johnson receiving heavy praise over his accomplishments it was surprising to see him quit following the 93′ Super Bowl season, but he saw it as a result of Jones taking over complete control over all team functions.
So we wonder how we will ever get back to the glory years of the 70’s and 90’s? For me the answer is pretty black and white. Cancel Jerry’s mass involvement within the team and hire yourself an experienced general manager and a damn good head coach. As long as these factors continue to not change, then you can pretty much kiss any post season success goodbye. Throw Brady in there, even Payton, and you can bet that you won’t see much of a difference. Folks, you need to hang on to Tony Romo. He could very well be the most talented quarterback in Cowboys history and possibly could have had a few rings by now if circumstances would have led him to another team. Love him or hate him, but you don’t know what you got till it’s gone.

Magic in Miami!

imageWhen you think of Miami sports icons you probably think of Lebron James right? Well you’d be smart to include Jose Fernandez In there too. Jose Fernandez is the new ace of the Miami Marlins pitching staff after having an unforgettable rookie season in which he was named Major League Baseball’s Rookie of the Year in 2013. Fernandez proves to be the future of this team as his numbers this year were ridiculous, having one of the most historical seasons ever recorded by a 21 year old. Born in Sant Clara, Cuba on July 31st, 1992, Jose is one of several Cuban rookies this season to display great numbers. His clutch roots come from hard trips in trying to find a venture to the United States for him, his mother, and sister to follow their stepfather Ramon Jimenez. He defected four times from Cuba with the first three ending in failure and costing him to be sentenced to a Cuban prison each time. The night they traveled was during a malicious storm in which his mother was drawn overboard and into the sea. Jose quickly dived in to save his mother without any hesitation. If you think that was heroic then you probably won’t believe this, he was only 15 when that happened. My hardest decisions I made at 15 were just trying to fit in with high school’s social cues. Jose Fernandez went to Braulio Alonso High in Tampa Bay, Florida which won two 6A baseball state championships his sophomore and senior seasons. Ramon had him train with Orlando Chinea, a Cuban native, that helped him cultivate within the United States and drastically improve his pitching talents. The power right hander went 13-1 with a 2.35 ERA and 134 strikeouts his final year at Alonso onto his last championship run. In 2011, he was selected by the Miami Marlins in the MLB draft 14th overall and was slated to start the 2012 season with the Jamestown Jammers of Class-A. He dominated his time there and quickly got promoted to the Jupitor Hammerheads to which he finished as the Miami Marlins minor league pitcher of the year. Flourishing numbers going 14-1 with a 1.75 ERA, 158 strikeouts in just 134 innings lead him to an invitation to join the team for the beginning of spring training next year. Obviously he was the Marlins top prospect, but Baseball America named him the 5th best prospect in all of baseball! After injuries to two Miami pitchers, they finally called up Jose to start his 2013 campaign. He debuted on April 7th at Citi Field against the New York Mets to which he set the baseball world ablaze with his 97 mph fastball and his sharp breaking curveball that left the Met’s hitters in shambles pitching five innings and allowing just one run with right strikeouts. Following more impressive starts like his 13 strikeout start against Pittsburg and his 14 strikeout performance against Cleveland, Fernandez was named to the 2013 All-Star team to represent the Marlins. This kid is still only 20 right? How can a kid this young and talented have gone so unnoticed to the previous 13 teams that passed up on him? He ended up pitching a perfect sixth inning and pitched his way into all of Marlin Nation’s heart. This phenom ended his historic season with a 12-6 record, 2.19 ERA, and 187 strikeouts which led him to the most prolific pitching season that Miami had ever seen since Josh Beckett’s 2003 World Series MVP run. Jose was in the top 10 of almost every statistical category for National League pitchers matching the likes of Clayton Kershaw, Adam Wainwright, Jordan Zimmerman, etc. Even with the Marlins going 62-100, the future is bright for folks in downtown Miami as Jose Fernandez is poised for greatness and can only get better from here, which is a scary thought if you’re a fan of the other 29 teams in baseball. So watch out Lebron, the crown is on the eyes of the Cuban sensation.